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Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Networking standards

Beware the black market rising for IP addresses

Organizations slow to adopt IPv6 take heed: Surging requests for IPv4 addresses are quickly drying up the available store, raising the specter of an IPv4 black market that could dramatically increase the cost of obtaining a presence on today's Internet.
 
Previous predictions pegged late 2011 as the anticipated date of IPv4 address exhaustion. But a sudden turnaround in the rate of allocation for IPv4 addresses this year has consumed an alarming number of "/8" IPv4 address blocks -- /8 being the unit of allocation to Regional Internet Registries (RIRs).
 
"There were just eight /8 allocations in all of 2009, but there have been six /8s issued just in the first 100 days of 2010," notes American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) CIO Richard Jimmerson.
 
As of this writing, only 20 IPv4 /8s remain in the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) pool of 256 /8s. At the current rate, the IANA pool may well be exhausted by the end of this year (see graph). And though the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 has been long anticipated, many organizations are ill-prepared for the fallout of IPv4 exhaustion. In addition to being required to maintain Web presence in both address spaces until the Internet's transition is complete, new services, such as Microsoft's DirectAccess, are increasingly becoming available only on IPv6, as tech vendors and service providers increasingly find IPv4 too expensive to support.