Fantastic Things to Do on Chalk Farm Road

Camden’s not had a lot of love recently. Back then, it was the epicenter of all that was cool. In this place, teenage Indie Cindys like me waited outdoors for famous boozers like The Hawley Arms in the hope of capturing a look of our guitar heroes (Pete, Carl– if you’re reading this, call me).

Nowadays, Camden’s understanding is of teenage goths and groups of travelers purchasing doubtful souvenirs from the myriad stalls of Camden Market. Soaring leas have presented a difficulty for the location’s hard-earned track record for imagination and self-reliance. There’s still plenty of peculiarities here– not least on Chalk Farm Road.

Whereas Camden High Street is mostly chain stores and traveler tat, Chalk Farm Road (which diminishes from Haverstock Hill and stops simply except Regent’s Canal) has a unique mix of independent stores, cafés, bars, and music places, in addition to the Camden Stables Market. It’s a significant road; however, you’ll discover plenty to do if you evade the traveler and the traffic crowds.

Nine kinds of shakshuka at Café Loren, my favorite of all the food stands in the Stables Market.

A complete English with some rounds of toast and lots of milky tea at Truly Scrumptious– and you’ll get alter from a tenner.

The fresh Ferrero Rocher gelato at Marine Ices: it’s an ambassador’s reception in your mouth.

A Middle Eastern salad at Iraqi-Kurdish Hawraman Café. It’s, unfortunately, dealing with closure, so go quickly.

Melty pieces of tacky goodness from The Cheese Bar in the Stables Market– their toasties will send out any salad ideas out the window.

A G&T in the beer garden at The Lock Tavern is a busy three-story bar that hosts Bands and DJs.

A nightcap at Joe’s Bar, where the vintage tunes play till late. It’s a little area that loads a colossal punch.

Sourdough from artisanal bakers Peace & Plenty. Take it home for a banging avo-toast.

Musical instruments from around the globe at Ray Man. It’s been a household company, given that 1972.

Unloved dishware at inexpensive rates from the Reject Pot Shop.

Charming old volumes from Walden Books, a gorgeous store concealed on domestic Harwood Street.

A set of Dr. Martens from the bootmaker’s brand-new flagship shop in the Market– after all, this is Camden!

Take a look at some up-and-coming skill at the Camden Assembly, previously the Barfly: an essential part of the Camden music scene.

Take a cocktail-making masterclass at Caribbean joint Cotton, Rhum Shack. Yes, you can evaluate as you go.

Have a night on the town at Proud Camden; the previous horse medical facility turned into a burlesque place and club.

Pay your aspects at the statue of Amy Winehouse– the much-missed and late queen of Camden.

Capture a set at a world-famous carrying out arts and performance location, the Roundhouse. There’s something to fit actually everybody, from spoken word to modern dance to DJ Shadow.

Camden’s not had a lot of love recently. In the last ten years, the open leafy areas of south London and the vibrant nightlife out east have taken its thunder. Back then, it was the epicenter of all that was cool. In this place, teenage Indie Cindys like me waited outdoors for famous boozers like The Hawley Arms in the hope of capturing a look of our guitar heroes (Pete, Carl– if you’re reading this, call me).

Nowadays, Camden’s understanding is of teenage goths and groups of travelers purchasing doubtful souvenirs from the myriad stalls of Camden Market. There’s still plenty of peculiarities here– not least on Chalk Farm Road.